“The 33” is a pleasing movie about a scary situation. The performances as very good, and credit Riggen for making the movie version of the story compelling. It’s unimaginable what these men had to go through, and it’s remarkable that they overcame the odds. It’s a feel good story that plays good on film, but it’s more than that. It’s a look at how difficult and scary the mining profession is. The struggle people have to make a living in countries like Chile. Ultimately it’s the families that matter the most, it’s the bond and love they have for each other. The 33 men were brothers when they went in and till the very end of the 69 days they were trapped in the cave, and this movie smartly centers around that concept.

Todd Haynes’ 2002 maniacally melodramatic Far From Heaven was soaked in Sirkian influence. You could see elements of Sirk’s Imitation of Life, All That Heaven Allows, and the drapery of Sirk’s brand of 1950’s filmmaking. But the subtler treat was the influence of David Lean’s achingly restrained British romance, Brief Encounter, one of my most favorite films. The bittersweet ending of Haynes’ Far From Heaven nods to Lean’s Brief Encounter, both films ending with heartbreak at a train station.

It is well known in the theater world that female playwrights are rarely produced on Broadway, and that female directors are doing only slightly better.

A new study suggests that beyond Broadway the picture is somewhat less dire. Last season 40 percent of the plays at leading Off Broadway and Off Off Broadway theaters were directed by women, and 29 percent were written by women.

But women’s progress varies widely when a broader range of theater jobs is considered. At the theaters studied women overwhelmingly dominated jobs as stage managers and costume designers. But men held the vast majority of jobs as designers of sets, lighting and sound.